Navigation

You are here: Home / Student Disability Resources / Faculty Handbook / Commonly Utilized Accommodations

Commonly Utilized Accommodations

Overview:

The following list is not an exhaustive list of accommodations or academic adjustments. This list is meant to provide instructors with a guide of potential accommodation requests that may be considered a reasonable accommodation in a classroom setting.

Students with Visual Impairments:

  • Electronic copies of notes, handouts, overheads, or chalkboard notes
  • Use of a scribe or note taker
  • Seating locations (close to the chalkboard or screen)
  • Tape-recorded lectures
  • Taped textbooks
  • Alternate test format: oral, Braille, or large print
  • Use of a computer with voice input or output software computer along with word processing software. For further information on some software products refer to: Jaws and Open Book, Kurzweil 1000 and 3000, IBM Via Voice, Dragon Naturally Speaking, Zoomtext.
  • Extended time and alternate locations for examinations
  • Use of a closed circuit enlargement system CCTV description
  • Copies of notes, overheads, chalkboard notes, handouts
  • Enlarged textbooks, notes, tests, handouts
  • Electronic textbooks

Students with Motor Impairments:

  • Relocation of the class to a more accessible location
  • Provide space among the desks for a wheelchair or a wheelchair accessible desk/table
  • Provide advanced notice if the class activity will be held elsewhere
  • Reduce the writing load through the use of handouts, supplementary texts, etc.
  • Use of a note-taker or tape recorder
  • Reasonable consideration for lateness due to difficulties in the location of classroom or schedule
  • Extended time for testing
  • Use of a computer for written work. Student may utilize: Dragon Naturally Speaking, IBM Via Voice,
  • Use of a scribe for testing
  • Oral or taped test responses
  • Provision of instructor's notes, overheads, chalkboard notes, and handouts when appropriate to reduce the need for writing (electronic copies of above may be preferred)

Students with Hearing Impairments:

  • Use of a sign language interpreter or real time captionist SDR Policies and Procedures for Interpreters in the Classroom, Student Responsibilities in Utilizing Interpreters, SDR Policies and Procedures for Real Time Captionists, Student Responsibilities in Utilizing a Real Time Captionist
  • Use of a note taker
  • Use of a tape recorder
  • Instructors using a lapel microphone for an assistive listening device (ald). For further information on ald's: http://www.wou.edu/education/sped/nwoc/demyst/
  • Seating location
  • Providing a written sheet of "new" terms is helpful
  • Use visual aids when possible
  • Provision of instructor's notes, overheads, chalkboard notes, and handouts when appropriate (electronic copies of above may be preferred)

Students with Speech Impairments:

  • Increased writing, decreased speaking tasks
  • Use of a voice output computer or other speech generated technology . Student may utilize: Dragon Naturally Speaking, IBM Via Voice,
  • Provide individual sessions to allow the student to clarify information presented in the lecture since the student may be reluctant to speak in class.

Students with Learning Disabilities and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder:

  • Seating location
  • Use of a note taker or tape recorder
  • Extended test time
  • Alternative location for a test
  • Use of memory aids such as a calculator, thesaurus, spell checker, or formula cardsDirections and deadlines given both orally and in writing
  • Use of visual aids when possible
  • Use of a word processor to take a test . Student may utilize: Kurzweil 1000 and 3000, IBM Via Voice, Dragon Naturally Speaking
  • Reduce the writing load through the use of handouts, supplementary texts, etc.

Students with Psychological Disabilities:

  • Reasonable consideration for absences and lateness
  • Reasonable consideration for fluctuating performance
  • Assisting in developing a study schedule
  • Use of a note-taker or tape recorder
  • Alternate test location to reduce anxiety and provide freedom from distractions
  • Special seating (e.g., next to the door, in the back of the room)
  • Extended time on testing and some assignments
  • Establish a signal to indicate when behavior is inappropriate