Navigation

You are here: Home / Student Disability Resources / Accommodations / Assistive Listening Devices, Sign Language Interpreters, CART, & Captioning

Assistive Listening Devices, Sign Language Interpreters, CART, & Captioning

 

Student Disability Resources (SDR) engages in an interactive process with each student and reviews requests for accommodations on an individualized, case-by-case basis. Depending on the nature and functional limitations of a student’s documented disability, he or she may be eligible for use of:


The most common
assistive listening device is a Frequency Modulated System, often referred to as an FM System.  The instructor wears a small microphone close to his or her mouth which then sends his or her voice to the receiver worn by the student.  SDR has several FM systems available for loan to students on a semester-by-semester basis.    

Sign language interpreters are provided by SDR as either an on-site or video remote service.  SDR ensures that interpreters are qualified to provide effective, accurate, and impartial receptive and expressive interpreting.  Sign language interpreters may be provided for classroom lectures, fieldwork, meetings with faculty members, and for any activity directly related to a student’s academic program.

Computer Assisted Real-Time Translation (CART) is instant translation of the spoken word into English text by a CART reporter using a stenotype machine, notebook computer, and real-time software.  The text is then displayed on a computer monitor for the student to read.  This accommodation provides on-the-spot communication access to information as it is being given.  Students may also receive a copy of an unedited transcript of the CART reporting.  CART may be provided for classroom lectures, fieldwork, meetings with faculty members, and for any activity directly related to a student’s academic program. 

Captioning is the text display of audio portions of videos.  Captioning should be accurate, synchronous, complete, and properly placed.  SDR shares responsibility with faculty to ensure that classroom material, including videos and movies, is accessible to all students.  SDR will assist faculty in identifying and contacting appropriate academic department course designers, media specialists, or IT specialists to oversee the video captioning.



Student Responsibilities:

  • Meet with your SDR disability specialist to discuss the need for accommodations related to a hearing impairment, which are determined on a semester-by-semester basis;
  • Provide faculty with academic adjustment letter to inform them of your need for the approved accommodation;
  • Contact SDR as soon as possible if you:
    • Make changes to your class schedule;
    • Are unable to attend class requiring the cancellation of interpreting or CART services;
    • Have concerns with any of the access or services.


SDR Responsibilities:

  • Meet with students to discuss the need for accommodations related to a hearing impairment;
  • Provide academic adjustment letters to students including these accommodations;
  • Assist faculty in identifying and contacting their departmental course designers, media specialists, or IT specialists to provide video captioning for all related course materials;
  • Arrange sign language interpreting or CART services for students approved for these accommodations;
  • Provide support and assistance to students and faculty regarding these accommodations.

Faculty Responsibilities:

  • Inform SDR of course materials requiring captioning in advance of the start of semester if contacted about a student with a hearing impairment to allow adequate time to prepare materials;
  • Respond to SDR staff if contacted about captioning material (e.g., video clips, movies) used within the context of the course;
  • Recognize that any material added during the course of the semester needs to be accessible to students with hearing impairments;
  • Upon receipt of an academic adjustment letter from a student, discuss the accommodation with him or her and provide support as needed;
  • Consider the following additional best practices when interacting in learning environments with students who have hearing impairments:
    • Face the student as often as possible when speaking;
    • Avoid standing with your back to a window or other light source;
    • Avoid blocking areas of your mouth with hand or objects;
    • Repeat questions or comments made by other people in the room.